Midland Fertility Goes Back to School

Issued: 9 February 2016

Midland Fertility went back to school to talk to GCSE and A-level students from The Polesworth School in Tamworth about the causes of and treatments for infertility.

The event continues the schools and colleges outreach activity first undertaken by Midland Fertility in 2007.

Midland Fertility at The Polesworth School (l-r): Jill Anthony-Ackery, communications manager at Midland Fertility; Olivia Bradford (15); Emily Chapman (15); Kiri Boag (15); Helen Miller-Jones, head  of design and technology; and Lynsey Bissell, communications executive at Midland Fertility
Midland Fertility at The Polesworth School (l-r): Jill Anthony-Ackery, communications manager at Midland Fertility; Olivia Bradford (15); Emily Chapman (15); Kiri Boag (15); Helen Miller-Jones, head of design and technology; and Lynsey Bissell, communications executive at Midland Fertility

Head of design and technology, Helen Miller-Jones, invited the Tamworth-based fertility clinic to make the presentation to bring to life the science of assisted conception and also to inform students about issues concerning their own future fertility.

Members of the communications team Jill Anthony-Ackery and Lynsey Bissell – who are both also former patients of Midland Fertility – covered common causes of infertility and considered how lifestyle can affect both male and female fertility.

The students were also asked to consider common misconceptions about fertility, including age-related chances of getting pregnant and the current need for assisted conception in the UK.

“Midland Fertility welcomes the chance to talk to students about fertility and infertility,” said Jill Anthony-Ackery.  “Nowadays young people are given every opportunity to fulfil their potential regarding careers and relationships – but few of them have an understanding of how this can affect their future fertility.

“So many choices are now available compared to their great-grandmothers’ generation – except for the window of opportunity for women to conceive naturally.  Also, modern life can sometimes decrease someone’s fertility.  These are essentials messages for young people and hopefully will help some avoid fertility-related problems in the future.

Helen Miller-Jones said: “Such a presentation from industry experts brings added value to the curriculum, teaching about assisted conception and informing young people about issues that will affect one in six of them when they are adults.”

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