Celebrating Ada Lovelace Day

15 October is ‘Ada Lovelace Day’ – a day ‘to celebrate women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics’.

At MFS we salute, in particular, the laboratory team – an all-female team of clinical embryologists, a semenologist, and bio-medical scientists who are instrumental in achieving the success rates at MFS and in ‘building futures, transforming lives’ for our patients.

Su Barlow, laboratory director (centre), with the team semenologist and some of the clinical embryologists (l-r): Gina Aldis, Valerie Fraser, Clare Wilson and Manjeet Hunjan
Su Barlow, laboratory director (centre), with the team semenologist and some of the clinical embryologists (l-r): Gina Aldis, Valerie Fraser, Clare Wilson and Manjeet Hunjan

Ada Lovelace was the daughter of the poet Lord Byron, a Victorian mother-of-three AND and is also credited as the world’s first computer programmer. Using her extraordinary mathematical skills, she developed an algorithm (a programme) for a machine to calculate numbers into small formulae, which could be coded to perform complex calculations or even to create music or art!  All this, 100+ years before the first computer was built, or before Steve Jobs or Bill Gates were even born!

Part of her legacy is the increasing number of women in science and technology, and at MFS we have our own high-achieving and highly-qualified women scientists who, every day, work with the essence of new life and use their scientific knowledge and skills to give people the chance of having a baby.

In the UK about 70% of women science graduates still decide on non-science related careers, and so MFS is proud that some of that special 30% make up 100% the clinic’s laboratory team.

For more information

Issued: 15 October 2014